Shop Mobile More Submit  Join Login

Contest + Features

Journal Entry: Sat Oct 25, 2014, 2:56 AM
Absence

I haven't been online much lately - actually, all I have done the past weeks was to upload some stock over at kuschelirmel-stock (and set up a contest - more on that below). I haven't even logged into this account since late September ^^;

So, just in case that happens again, if you need to get a hold of me, please send your note to kuschelirmel-stock as well.


Stock Use Contest

I am holding a "use my stock and win great prizes" contest over at my stock account - I would so love to see a lot of entries! It runs until January 1st and the only "theme" is that you use my stock :D



Some of the prizes offered are points (over 3000 points all together) and exclusive stock, for example:

Tuscany Exclusives 02 by kuschelirmel-stock Paris Exclusives Stock Pack by kuschelirmel-stock
Switzerland Exclusives Stock by kuschelirmel-stock Wild Horses Exclusives by kuschelirmel-stock by kuschelirmel-stock


Features


- by Helga-Helleborus

Two Sins by alexnoreaga

Weeping of violin by MiloshJevremovic

We're not in Wonderland anymore Alice. by eikoweb

Kidnapped princesses island by cornacchia-art

Sentiently Natural by erlangwind

Purgatory II by a-pretty-white-lie

Brunnhilda by erlangwind

Silent hill by SergeyZabelin

Pyrokinesis by Gejda

Young Merlin by PerlaMarina

Lost Time by daniyalisatya

Soren by bagusradhityo

City of Music by MirellaSantana

PACEMAKER by missfotografie

Paradise by Kryseis-Art

Mother Of Dragons by Whendell

In Flame by zacky7avenged

Species 2 by alexnoreaga

Fragile by itznikki530

:heart:



:icontypewriter-hplz::icontypewriter-oplz::icontypewriter-wplz:           :icontypewriter-tplz::icontypewriter-oplz:   

:icontypewriter-tplz::icontypewriter-uplz::icontypewriter-eplz::icontypewriter-splz::icontypewriter-dplz::icontypewriter-aplz::icontypewriter-yplz:     

Hi Everybody :wave:

In this week's How To Tuesday, we'll be looking at awesome eye tutorials. From enhancing the colours, to making demon eyes, Deviant Art's Tutorial Section has it all. 

How bout creating a manipulation this week using one of these techniques, and sharing it the group to see? 


Digital Eye Makeup Tutorial by CutspringDark Eyes Tutorial by Autopsyrotica-ArtCaptivating Eyes Tutorial by Cutspring
Tutorial: Beautiful Eyes 101 by vanity-insecurity
Shining eyes - Tutorial by eclipsy
Demon Eyes Tutorial by HiroshimaPHOTOGRAPHYEye Tutorial by MeganLeeRetouching

Don't forget to comment if you want to request anything specific you want covered in next weeks edition!!




Tutorial Treasury 05

Journal Entry: Thu Oct 3, 2013, 2:14 AM


In the Tutorial Treasury, you will find tutorials geared towards Photomanipulators and some that will deal with a broader subjects, such as lighting, colour etc. The tutorials will be from dA as well as from all over the web and in each episode, there will be 3 to 6 tutorials for your reading pleasure (any more than that I guess no one will have time to read anyway). If you find any good ones, shoot me a note so I can include them in the next installment!


The Tutorials

Image063-250x250 by kuschelirmel

"Learn how to create this cinematic scene in quick and easy steps! This Photoshop tutorial will show you how to blend images to create an apocalyptic scene and add flying meteors with premade Photoshop brushes. You’ll also learn several different ways to add lighting effects and create a strong atmosphere. ~ written by  Jarka Hrnčárková ~"

:bulletpurple: Read more here


Photomanip Tut by kuschelirmel

"tamaraR shows you how she created her deviation Wild - please respect her wishes not to copy her work, but to use the techniques taught in your own way."

:bulletpurple: Read more here


Water Creatures by kuschelirmel

"A bug made out of water - or a violin - or whatever your heart desires! This tutorial by B-O-K-E shows you how to do it."

:bulletpurple: Read more here


Watercolor31final1-250x250 by kuschelirmel

"Create this spring-inspired abstract photo manipulation by Jenny Le! This tutorial will show you how to combine stock photos and splatter brushes together, apply textures, and more."

:bulletpurple: Read more here


Broken Glass Tutorial By Abbeymarie-d5rbl88 by kuschelirmel

"Feels just like I'm walking on broken glass... If you want to have some flying shards of broken glass in your manip, this tutorial by AbbeyMarie is just the thing for you!"

:bulletpurple: Read more here


Making Ghosts  Tutorial  By Zummerfish-d5j6nec by kuschelirmel

"With Halloween right around the corner, here's a little extra for you: zummerfish shows you how to create a ghost for your spooky manip!"

:bulletpurple: Read more here



Articles and Links
Photomanipulation for Beginners

an article about what photomanipulation is and what you need to try it - and on the ever so important issue of "where do I get pictures to play with?"

--> read article <--

Copyright

Of Copyright & Premades
is an article that strives to explain what copyright means, who it protects and that simply putting work into something will not make using something without permission okay.

Know your Basics - article series:

A series of articles that try to explain some basics in art that you may or may not have heard of before but didn't know what to do with them. All of them are written especially for photo- manipulators, but the principles should hold true in any genre.

--> Know your basics - Colour Theory <--
--> Know your basics - Composition <--
--> Know your basics - Perspective <--
--> Know your basics - Textures <--

Tutorial Treasury

--> 01 | 02 | 03 | 04 | 05 <--

Journal Stock Credits: Kaotiksymphony-Stock and MouritsaDA-Stock.

Know your Basics - Textures

Journal Entry: Thu Mar 28, 2013, 10:44 AM


There are a lot of tutorials out there on how to create / photograph texture as well as how to use them on a technical level, but the question of why and when to use textures is rarely touched. This article wants to fill that gap and therefore looks at texures from a slightly different perspective.

Textures in Manips as you know them

For a photomanipulator, the first thing that comes to mind when hearing the word "texture" are images that can be used in soft light or overlay mode to texture a manipulation or parts thereof. What most manipulators therefore have in mind, are images like the following:

Dear Hermine Grunge Texture by ValerianaSTOCK 2477x3889 Untld. 96 by pandoraicons green distressed wood textur2I by beckas Broken stone texture red by Seeb-san Northern Lights by pendlestock

Beautiful textures, sure, and useful, too, but have you ever thought of doing more with them than the aforementioned overlays? And have you ever considered using other kinds of textures, too?

A more objective look at Textures

The following definition is an excerpt from the google dicitionary (I omitted the parts that have nothing to do with this article):

tex·ture
  • The feel, appearance, or consistency of a surface or a substance (skin texture and tone; the cheese is firm in texture; the different colors and textures of bark)
  • The character or appearance of a textile fabric as determined by the arrangement and thickness of its threads (a dark shirt of rough texture)
  • The tactile quality of the surface of a work of art

So textures in "the real world" are something to touch and feel, something that will also influence the appearance of a surface - for example think of naturally occuring textures such as bark, velvet, leather. And they are something you can see, too, think of smooth skin or rough wood, of messy hair or grass and smooth, polished metal.


That in turn means: not only something with bumps and ridges and obvious structure is a texture, but also what we generally perceive as "not textured" is!


Let's take a look at an image that you would normally call "not textured" to illustrate this point:

Untitled Drawing by kuschelirmel

What you can also see in this example, is that smooth and rough textures are both in there and their contrast is what makes the image work. For example, if the sea were not calm, the waves would create unrest and the trees on the hill would no longer stand out. It would all just "mush together".

And that is an effect you can also get from overlaying one texture over everything. I'll show you one of my "early works" to demonstrate:

January by kuschelirmel

While at this point I had figured out how to use masks to get smooth transitions as described in this tutorial, there's just something off about that load of textures. Today, I would do it differently: I would get rid of the overlay textures in the middle where the fractals are to make sure the fractals could stand out from the background (maybe I'd try to make them glow - definitely I'd change the overall lighting which here is not existent).

Let's look at some more examples from around deviantArt:

and see why they work so well from a texture point of view:



This images uses all kinds of different textures to draw your eye to the focal point: the girl is smooth throughout, even her hair seems soft and orderly without being unnaturally neat. The ground is made of stone and sand within a relatively calm sea. The almost idyllic image gets some tension through the sharp edged shards of glass, the glass itself being smooth.




Detailed and contrast-rich smoke textures around the figure give it an eerie quality which is enhanced by the none-distracting outer edges of the canvas. There you have only hints at the big folds of a curtain or something similar.


Boundaries between life and death by IvanVlatkovic

The subtle use of textures in this image is just stunning: they serve as a 3D environment forming the ground and the back "wall" of the "room" the guy is kneeling in, while keeping it abstract enough so our brain doesn't protest at the surrealism of the other elements in the image (tiny trees, big leaves etc). Other textures have a more graphic function, pulling together the elements (the light bent lines that go over some of the leaves or the dripping textures on the heart for example).


Dream of Freedom by ReyeD33

The grimy prison wall is in stark contrast with the world outside, just like life in prison and freedom are different things alltogether.


She draws crosses on the walls. by daunhaus

Smooth and textured areas work together to form something almost abstract.


Taste of Death by Keid

Darkness and light - good and evil - represented in colours, tones and texture.


DARK SIDE by grohsARTig

A great example of abstract art using textures and smoothness to draw the viewers' eyes.



Rusty Cage by NikkiNightBloom

And lastly, one image to serve as the exception that prooves the rule: in this one, the textures are very prominent throughout the image and in this case, they help to enhance the horror-movie atmosphere. But also note that even though the textured-vs-smooth contrast is not evident, there is another form of contrast to take its place: darkness and light.

So how am I supposed to use these textures?

In the case of textures seen as rough vs. smooth patches, the answer as to how to use them naturally goes beyond the aforementioned "use something from the texture gallery and put it on soft light" approach. Even if you include selective application of such textures, you would fall short of what we have seen in the examples above. Often, the texture is already inherent in the photographs you use to create your manips, so maybe instead of asking yourself if you want something to be "textured" at all (as in overlay a texture image), rather ask yourself:

"Are the different elements of these base images helping my image when i put them together or does it feel distracting?"

If you do it that way, yuo might end up deciding to get rid of some more bushes and use more uniform-looking grass instead (or add some bushes if you need more texture) to make sure your main object / animal / person is in focus.

A very popular method to get rid of texture and focus on the main subject is to blur the background and the foreground, mimicking photographic depth of field blur. This sometimes works great, other times I feel like someone was just lazy with their background and overall composition, so they blurred it. It's more or less the "oposite" of using a texture layer all over (or on just the background), just this time, you remove texture instead of adding it.

Here are some examples of where this method works well:

<da:thumb id="357467607"/> Moon Ninja by Nikulina-Helena
  Your ass belongs to me ! by blaithiel Old- Styled Life by DarkDevil16 Sacrifice by Rafaelll90
BUTTERFLIES by MirellaSantana

This method creates texture-vs-smooth contrast and a sense of depth (see Know your basics - Perspective) all at once, which is probably why it's so popular and often abused rather than used.

Just remember: whatever you do, do it with your eyes open and aware of the effect and considering its negative side effects. And besides: Thinking about an alternative is a good idea to stand out from the crowd.


In Closing

Textures are just one aspect of any image, be it a photomanipulation or a drawing or whatever else, but it can pay off to think about them for a few moments longer than you may be used to. Any image draws their energy from the contrast (or lack thereof) between its individual elements - and aside from light/dark and colour, texture is another way to create contrast!

If you liked this article, you may also like the others from this series, they are linked below.

 :heart:
Jasmin



Articles and Links
Photomanipulation for Beginners

an article about what photomanipulation is and what you need to try it - and on the ever so important issue of "where do I get pictures to play with?"

--> read article <--

Copyright

Of Copyright & Premades
is an article that strives to explain what copyright means, who it protects and that simply putting work into something will not make using something without permission okay.

Know your Basics - article series:

A series of articles that try to explain some basics in art that you may or may not have heard of before but didn't know what to do with them. All of them are written especially for photo- manipulators, but the principles should hold true in any genre.

--> Know your basics - Colour Theory <--
--> Know your basics - Composition <--
--> Know your basics - Perspective <--
--> Know your basics - Textures <--

Tutorial Treasury

--> 01 | 02 | 03 | 04 | 05 <--

Journal Stock Credits: Kaotiksymphony-Stock and MouritsaDA-Stock.
Hello Popo-Licious! Thank you so much for agreeing to be interviewed for photoshop-tutorials :la: Could you please tell us a little bit about yourself?

No problem! The pleasure is all mine! I'm a twenty-three year old graduate student and have been a member of deviantART for over seven years. I've been a fan of anime and video games for most of my life, which is where I take a lot of my inspiration from. I started using Photoshop and various Wacom products about ten years ago, and ever since then, I've been hooked on digital mediums. I'm left handed, I do all my sketching in pen as opposed to pencil, and I like cold weather. >w<

Most people know you for your pen tool tutorial - did you expect it to go as viral as it has?

Not at all! When I was in the process of creating the tutorial, my goal was to simply fill in the gaps where other tutorials hadn't provided the community with enough information about how the tool worked, or how best to use it. For instance, I think one of the most common comments that I get is users thanking me for simply mentioning that you need to hold down CTRL while using the tool; it's totally necessary, but several of the popular tutorials out there never mentioned this step at all!

I like to think that the appeal of my particular tutorial is that it breaks the process down step by step by step with a simple, abstract shape, and then shows you how the tool can be applied to more complicated projects, such as lineart. It's important to start small and build up your skills, or else you'll just get frustrated.

When I posted the tutorial, I never dreamed that it would take off, but I thank everyone who has viewed it or left a comment. :)



Approximately how long did you spend writing the tutorials?

Not too long, actually! I think the pen tool tutorial took me a few days to complete, mostly because I had never written a tutorial before. The hair coloring tutorial was something I was able to complete in an evening. With that one, I already knew what I wanted to say, and I already had a template to work with.

Do you think the visualisation of the tutorial is important (fancy backgrounds / text etc.)?

I think the visual aspect of tutorial making is extremely important. In particular, organization is essential, and it seems to be the downfall of many potentially great resources. You don't need to have fancy fonts or elaborate embellishments to make your tutorial shine. In fact, that can often times lessen the impact of your tutorial and distract from the points that you're trying to make if you include too many superfluous additions.

The most important thing to remember is that your tutorial should flow, and be a narrative of sorts. The steps should be clearly delineated and explained, and you should be able to easily follow your own tutorial to replicate the techniques that you're trying to teach. (Doing this is also a good way to make sure that you haven't forgotten a step!)

What advice would you give people who want to start writing tutorials?

My top piece of advice would be to always try out your own tutorial before you post it. Pretend that you aren't an expert, and assume nothing. Just follow the steps exactly as you've written them and see if you can reach the final product. If you're successful in this, I think it's a safe bet that you have a nicely crafted, helpful tutorial.

Do you feel that the deviantART community is grateful for your tutorials? Does their attitude towards your tutorial deviations differ from your non-tutorial deviations?

I definitely feel like the community has been very grateful and supportive! Those who have used my tutorials have been very generous with their comments, and I absolutely love it when people send me links to what they've managed to create with my resources. It's a great feeling! Every once in a while I'll receive a few mean-spirited or irrelevant comments, but overall, the response has been very positive.

I feel that both my tutorials and artwork are generally well-received, but in different ways. With artwork, you're creating something for enjoyment, but with a tutorial, you're teaching and benefiting your audience. As a result, I think the community is much more willing to bestow praise and ask questions when there's an opportunity to grow as an artist. There's a gracious, thankful attitude that comes with tutorials that isn't always felt with regular submissions. Overall though, the general attitude is positive, and the community has been extremely supportive and kind.


Recent Journal Entries